FINANCE

100% donation goes to children.

Yeah, 100%.

2021 ANNUAL REPORT

Dear YANA family,

A sweenter the third year of the pandemic,

it can feel like little has changed since everything started,

or maybe even like there’s little to celebrate.

 

We’re here to tell you, however, that a virus is no match for our God,

and that even when we are tired, He never stops working!

 

Thanks to your time, energy, prayers, and financial support,

a lot happened here at YANA this past year.

 

Here’s an overview of the highlights :

YSAP

Now in its eighth year(2022),

YSA YSAP has brought over a total of eight Korean students

(ranging in grades from middle school to college)

to study in the U.S. since its inception.

In June, we celebrated our first college graduation

with the very first student to join our program 

(congrats, Eunji!), and our most recent student

graduated high school and began attending college.

What a year!

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YANA 119

In Korea, the number to dial for emergencies is “119,”

and we certainly felt the urgency this year.

While we’ve always known of the many ways

young adults struggle after aging out of group homes,

we were contacted in March by Kyeongmin Kim,

a 25-year-old who was diagnosed with osteosarcoma (bone) cancer, but could not afford treatment.

Moved by his story, we created YANA 119

to help abandoned young adults seek the medical

care they critically need, but could not previously afford.

 

Since March, we’ve partnered with 45 clinics and doctors, and disbursed $15,000 to 12 young adults.

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YANA 119

In Korea, the number to dial for emergencies is “119,”

and we certainly felt the urgency this year.

While we’ve always known of the many ways

young adults struggle after aging out of group homes,

we were contacted in March by Kyeongmin Kim,

a 25-year-old who was diagnosed with osteosarcoma (bone) cancer, but could not afford treatment.

Moved by his story, we created YANA 119

to help abandoned young adults seek the medical

care they critically need, but could not previously afford.

 

Since March, we’ve partnered with 45 clinics and doctors, and disbursed $15,000 to 12 young adults.

YNOT CONFERENCE

In June, we gathered 31 organizations across 

Korea, Canada, and the U.S. to hold our first

annual YNOT Conference. With services supporting

single mothers, adoptees, children in group

homes, and young adults who have aged out of the

system, these organizations work across the full

spectrum of orphan care in Korea. We were joined

byby actress Aera Shin and Starbucks Korea CEO

David Song, who gave keynote speeches that rallied

and encouraged us all. A leadership group was

established in September, and planning is already

underway for the 2022 conference. We look forward

to the new environment of collaboration and

support that can grow out of this group as we con

tinue improving the ways we serve our youth together

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PROJECT JOY

In Korea, the number to dial for emergencies is “119,”

and we certainly felt the urgency this year.

While we’ve always known of the many ways

young adults struggle after aging out of group homes,

we were contacted in March by Kyeongmin Kim,

a 25-year-old who was diagnosed with osteosarcoma (bone) cancer, but could not afford treatment.

Moved by his story, we created YANA 119

to help abandoned young adults seek the medical

care they critically need, but could not previously afford.

 

Since March, we’ve partnered with 45 clinics and doctors, and disbursed $15,000 to 12 young adults.